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May 26

Grumpy Cowboy by Max Monroe Review

5 SMOOCHES!

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SYNOPSIS:

ATTENTION: If you have been a victim of false advertising, you may be entitled to compensation. If you were ever hired to take care of a fourteen-year-old boy’s knee injury on a luxury ranch in the Middle of Nowhere, Utah, but that fourteen-year-old boy ended up being a tall, rough-and-tumble, muscular, one-hundred-percent all-man cowboy by the name of Rhett Jameson, you may have been put at risk for falling in love. Please seek counsel immediately.

 Dear Counselor,

It was supposed to be a simple favor for my very important boss, Frank Kaminsky of the Salt Lake Slammers professional basketball team—go to his good friend Tex Jameson’s luxury ranch and provide personal medical care for his recently injured teenage son.

I thought it’d be a working vacation of sorts—a chance for my city-girl self to experience something I would never otherwise do—but everything is upside down, and absolutely nothing is as I thought it would be.

For one, this patient is not a teenage boy.

He’s a real-life, blue-eyed, tough-as-nails, thirtysomething cowboy who is so darn strong he looks like he could lift a car just for the heck of it. 

He’s also stubborn, rude, and we don’t get along…at all.

Add in the heart-melting vision of him as a single father to the cutest little girl on the planet, and I’ve found myself in a whole different dimension of trouble.

Lust. Feelings. A whole lot of enemies-to-lovers-style complication. 

Please help me. My name is Dr. Leah Levee, I am a victim of false advertising, and if I’m not careful, this Grumpy Cowboy might just be the death of me.

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REVIEW:

When I need to laugh, when I want to smile through a book, when I just want to read something light and fun, I know I can crack open a book from Max Monroe and get that and so much more. Grumpy Cowboy is Max Monroe’s first go at a cowboy romance, and they turned out one heck of a sizzling slow-burn, enemies-to-lovers romantic comedy set on a ranch in Utah for their first cowboy themed romance.

Former rodeo star, Rhett, is a single-dad and a cowboy who runs his family’s ranch. He’s stubborn, strong-willed and recently injured. He’s not exactly following his doctor’s orders, and Tex, his equally stubborn, strong-willed cowboy father, steps in with a plan. Enter Leah, an orthopedic surgeon for a professional basketball team in Salt Lake City owned by Frank, an old friend of Tex’s. Frank asks Leah for a favor—to stay at the ranch for the summer to provide intensive, hands-on medical care and rehabilitation to Rhett. He leaves out some key details, and Leah accepts the assignment thinking the patient is a teenage boy. Rhett has no idea what his dad had planned until Leah shows up on his doorstep.

To say that Leah and Rhett didn’t see eye-to-eye is putting it mildly. Rhett really put Leah through the wringer, but I loved how she not only didn’t back down, but she rose to each of his challenges. These hilarious moments were uproariously funny, and there was one scene where Leah was exercising the cattle that just might be the funniest scene Max Monroe has ever written. Along the way, though, Leah and Rhett come to an understanding and everything between them shifts as their heated exchanges morph into blazing attraction. Rhett’s adorable daughter, Josephine, is a scene-stealing, ray of sunshine, and I adored her and Leah’s bond.

Grumpy Cowboy was an amusing mix of sweet, sexy, slow-burn romance and the kind of laugh-out-loud, cheeks hurt from smiling humor that I love about Max Monroe. An absolute pleasure to read, I smiled and swooned the whole way through Rhett and Leah’s story. Five smooches from me for Grumpy Cowboy by Max Monroe!

~Danielle Palumbo

 

 


BUY IT NOW!

Amazon US  |  Amazon Worldwide

 

 

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